First-Year Course Descriptions

Friendly reminder: if you are entering your first year of university, it is strongly recommended that you choose 1000 level courses. 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-1013. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Special Topics

This is an introduction to the study of contemporary cultures and languages and to the methods of ethnographic fieldwork.

 

ANTH-1023. Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

An introduction to the study of humans as a biocultural species. The focus of this course is on human evolution, human variation and genetics, nonhuman primates, and the work of physical anthropologists.


AQUINAS

AQGB-EN1006. Aquinas - Introduction to Literature

An introduction to the range and variety of literature in English, to the practice of critical reading, and to writing about ideas and texts in conventional academic language and forms. The course concentrates on the central genres of literature.

 

AQGB-PH1006. Intro to Western Philosophy

An introduction, through lecture, reading of original sources, and discussion, to the origins and development of western philosophy. The first part of the course studies this tradition from its beginnings in ancient Greece through the Christian Middle Ages. Authors read include Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. Themes include the nature of reality, the nature of human being and human knowledge; moral and political philosophy; the existence and nature of God. The latter part of the course continues the survey of developments in western philosophy, from the early modern period to contemporary discussion. The focus is on rationalism, empiricism, idealism, and the reactions these provoked.

 

AQGB-PO1006. Intro to Political Science

Through the study of a small number of core texts, it provides an introduction to some of the key questions at the centre of political life. The course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of political thought. It also concentrates on the development of the skills in logical analysis, writing, and political argument necessary for upper-level courses in the discipline.

 

BIOLOGY

BIOL-1503. Principles of Biology I 

This course introduces students to the study of life. Topics include the scientific method, biological molecules, cell structure and function, energy flow, respiration, and photosynthesis.

 

BIOL-1513. Principles of Biology II

This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.


COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY

COPP-1013. Introduction to Communications

This course introduces students to the history and evolution of the communications profession, with particular emphasis on communications in the public policy sphere, from the pioneers who sold ideas on behalf of their clients, to the modern world of two-way communications with the public through the internet and social media tools. The course will explore how this evolution is changing the way governments, politicians, non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations interact with the public.

 

COPP-1023. Introduction to Policy Studies

This course introduces students to the policy making process, how policies are researched, drafted, legislated, and communicated. The course will also explore how non-governmental organizations, citizens groups and corporations influence public policy.


CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRIM-1013. Introduction to Criminology

This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of criminology: its origins, the nature of disciplinary debates, and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves an examination of crime patterns, causes of criminal behaviour and crime prevention strategies. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

 

CRIM-1023. Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is designed to introduce the student to the role criminology plays in both formulating and critiquing criminal justice policy and a sampling of theoretical and methodological issues. It involves a critical look at the nature of the criminal justice system, the role of the state and the creation of policies through the passing of bills, legislation, and statutes pertinent to the interpretation of the Criminal Code. This course also introduces the student to core topics covered in electives in the second year: courts, young offenders, police, corrections, and victimology. This introductory course is a prerequisite for all upperlevel courses.

 

ECONOMICS

ECON-1013. Introduction to Economics (Micro)

This course examines the behaviour of consumers and producers in a market economy. Among the issues discussed will be environmental protection, wealth and poverty, and the extent of corporate power.

 

ECON-1023. Introduction to Economics (Macro)

This course analyzes the Canadian economy and how it works. It includes a discussion of output, unemployment, growth, money, international trade, and finance.

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

ENGL-1016. English Literatures in History and Culture

An introduction to literatures in English including, but not restricted to, the British literary canon. It teaches students to read and write effectively, and to locate texts in history and culture. The course includes a chronological introduction sensitive to the structures and intersections of literary periods.

 

ENGL-1233. Digital Literacy

Students will learn, use, and critique digital productivity tools, multimedia and website development tools, and Web 2.0 tools, while they apply literary methodologies to broader issues and debates like cyber safety, digital privacy laws and ethics, the economic and social engineering implications of user-data, as well as modes of digital communication and collaboration. Familiarity with critical theories and historical trends will help students understand how social and political movements develop the form, genre, and style of digital platforms.

 

ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

ENVS-1013. Understanding Environmental Problems

Earth systems science reveals that the environmental conditions that supported the development of human civilization over the past 10,000 years are becoming increasingly destabilized. This course introduces students to the Earth's regulatory systems such as climate, nitrogen and phosphorus flows, forests, oceans and biodiversity, and the social structures and processes that are interfering with them. Students will come to understand that environmental problems cannot be solved by individual behavioural changes; solutions will require collective action to achieve systemic change.

 

ENVS-1023. Environmental Praxis I: Thinking Globally, Acting Locally

Praxis can be understood as reflection and action for social change. Drawing on learning in ENVS 1013, students will investigate how global environmental problems are manifested at the local level. They will then develop local action strategies to effect change in those systems. This approach will foster citizenship skills and empower students in the face of global problems. This course will qualify for the 麻豆社区 Experiential Learning Certificate. Prerequisite: ENVS 1013.

 

FINE ARTS 

FNAR-1023. Introduction to Music Theory and Performance

The course examines the basic elements of music (notation, intervals, keys, scales, chords, meter) from a practical, hands-on perspective and introduces music theory and performance. Assignments include recognizing notes and rhythms on the staff, singing, and playing instruments. Please note that previous music experience is welcome but not required for this course. Note: Students who take FNAR 1023 cannot receive credit for FNAR 1743. 

 

FNAR-1061. Voice Technique I

This course is an in-depth exploration of voice technique. During the course, students will do exercises to develop their breathing, phonation, resonance, and articulation skills. Students will also examine the physiology of the voice and expand their awareness of how the voice works, vocal problems, and vocal care and health. In addition, students will perform songs from popular music styles such as musical theatre, rock, pop, and gospel for a public audience. All levels welcome. Prerequisites: FNAR 1023 or FNAR 1743.

 

FNAR-1113. Practical Introduction to Art Fundamentals

This course is a practical introduction to concepts, basic materials, processes and the vocabulary of art and design delivered through slide lectures, readings and assigned projects. The concepts introduced in this course are applicable to a wide range of art and design practices. There are special presentations including visiting artist presentations, film screenings and trips to art galleries.

 

FNAR-1333. Drawing and Sketching 1

A practical course in the fundamentals of two-dimensional art practice with an emphasis on outdoor drawing and sketching. Students are introduced to a variety of drawing media including the use of pencil, charcoal, and ink. Landscape, figure and non-representational drawing practice are addressed. No prior experience is necessary. Prerequisite: FNAR 1113.

 

FNAR-1633. Drawing and Sketching II

A practical course in the fundamentals of two-dimensional art practice with an emphasis on outdoor drawing and sketching in various media. Pre-requisite: FNAR 1333, Drawing and Sketching I or FNAR 1113, Practical Introduction to Art Fundamentals.

 

FNAR-1733. Intro to Musical Theatre

Introduction to Musical Theatre is a primer for students who are curious about performing musical theatre and would like the opportunity to enhance their skills in a supportive environment. This course introduces students to the three core skills required of musical theatre performers: singing, acting, and dancing. The course stresses development through individual and group exercises in physical and emotional awareness, movement, scene study, character creation and voice technique. The class will culminate in a studio performance of standard pieces of the musical theatre repertoire. Co-requisite: FNAR 1743: Music Literacy for Actors and Dancers.

 

FNAR-1743. Musical Literacy for Actors and Dancers

Music Literacy for Actors and Dancers is a course for the performer who has not yet developed a connection between his or her musical experience and standard aspects of musical performance, with a special focus on the acquisition of fluency reading the notated score and the development of effective study and practice habits. Music materials used in class or assigned for homework will be spoken, clapped, sung, and played. Co-requisite: FNAR 1733 Intro to Musical Theatre. Note: Students who take FNAR 1743 cannot receive credit for FNAR 1023.

 

FRENCH

FREN-1016. Langue Francaise 1

This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Basic, Basic+ or Intermediate in French in high school. The aims of this course are listening comprehension,basic oral expression, elementary reading, writing and grammar. In addition, students are required to attend a one-hour compulsory monitor session per week.

 

FREN-1026. Langue Francaise 2

This course is designed for students entering university who achieved a score of Intermediate+ or Advanced in French in high school. The course has a strong reading component with material drawn from a variety of sources in the Francophone world. It emphasizes the four skills: oral practice, reading, writing and listening comprehension. This course is not open to students who have graduated from a French or Francophone school. The department invites these students to register into a 2000-level French course.


GERONTOLOGY

GERO-1013. Introduction to Gerontology

This course introduces students to the field of Gerontology. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, the course examines the study of aging from a social, psychological, and physical perspective. Topics to be studied include ageism, population aging, physical and psychological aspects of aging and gerontological theory.

 

GERO-1023. Aging in Canada

This course examines the experiences of growing older in Canada. This includes a review of Canada's healthcare, pension systems and other social structures and policies which directly impact older adults in Canadian society.

 

GREAT BOOKS

GRBK-1006. Great Thinkers and Writers

This course explores how great books address perennial human questions about knowledge, nature, love, justice, and freedom. The course is team-taught by two faculty members and prioritizes conversation over lecture. Together we read a range of great books from the ancient world up to the present day, such as novels by writers like Jane Austen and Toni Morrison, classical works by Homer, Plato and Augustine, and influential works of political thought by Aristotle, Nietzsche and Hannah Arendt.


HISTORY

HIST-1123. Introduction to Food in World History

This course explores how food was made, consumed, and understood in the past. What did food and eating mean to different people at different times, in different places? How did everyday foods, like sugar or potatoes, travel around the world? What impacts did human-made and natural disasters have on eating habits and food supplies, and how did the presence and absence of food influence people's behaviour? In this course, students learn to connect local and global interactions, past events, and the present through food. (formerly HIST 2123). Students who have taken HIST 2123 cannot take this course for credit.

 

HIST-1143. Modern Africa

Modern Africa surveys the history of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present. The course focuses on three major topics: the scramble for Africa and the partition, European colonial rule, and the assessment of the post-independence era. Subtopics include missionaries and explorers, occupation and forms of resistance, settler colonies versus non-settler colonies, nationalism and wars of independence, post-independence successes and challenges, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and globalization and the fading significance of the nation state. The objectives for this course are to challenge stereotypic notions about contemporary Africa, to contribute to students' understanding of Africa's place in the modern world, and to introduce students to some of the major historiographical debates on modern African history. (formerly HIST 2143). Students who have taken HIST 2143 cannot take this course for credit.

 

HIST-1153. A History of Magic and Demons

What is magic? What are demons? How have constantly evolving beliefs about the supernatural impacted the course of human history (and vice versa)? This introductory survey explores how various cultures have sought to understand their world through appeal to supernatural forces-around the globe and throughout the ages.

 

HIST-1173. Cars in World History

Cars have shaped our world more than any other technology over the past century. Mass motorization created new opportunities for travel and consumption, changed the way people worked, transformed cities, and contributed to rising pollution and climate change. In this course we will explore the car's social, cultural, and environmental impacts on a global scale. (formerly HIST 3173). Students who took HIST 3173 cannot take this course for credit.

 

HIST-1413. Citizens and Citizenship in World History

This course will explore the history of citizenship on a global scale since about 1800. How have ideas and practices related to citizenship changed over time? How did new nation-states try to define citizenship? How did people try to secure recognition, rights, and human rights? How do themes of age, gender, race, class, and ethnicity relate to the question of citizenship in the modern era? These are a few of the questions and themes that the class will investigate by looking at some interesting case studies. (formerly HIST 3413) Students who have taken HIST 3413 cannot take this course for credit.

 

HIST-1763. Sport in World History

This discussion-based course explores the global impact of modern sport from c. 1850 to the present. It focuses upon the global spread of sports such as track and field, soccer, cricket, hockey, and baseball and the manner in which such sports were resisted or appropriated by communities throughout the world. Course content examines the political, social, and cultural significance of modern sport rather than the intricate details of individual athletes or teams. (formerly HIST 3763). Students who have taken HIST 3763 cannot take this course for credit.

 

HUMAN RIGHTS

HMRT-1003. Introduction to Human Rights

This course will introduce students to the study of human rights by investigating the question What are human rights? The course will proceed primarily through a number of examples and case studies. Students will also be given an overview of the basic instruments, institutions, and ideas relevant to human rights.

 

ITALIAN

ITAL-1006. Introduction to Italian

Introduction to the Italian Language. Phonetics, oral training, and conversation. Basic grammar with oral and written exercises. Basic reading and composition. Introduction to Italian civilization with the aid of audio-visual techniques.

 

JOURNALISM

JOUR-1023. The Messenger: Great Stories of Journalism

This course will introduce students to a range of works of print and broadcast Journalism to allow them to understand the scope, purpose, and influence of stories in the journalistic tradition. Students will respond to these works in writing and post their responses in an online discussion forum.

 

JOUR-1113. Fundamentals of Effective Writing

Vigorous and clear writing is the foundation for all forms of digital journalism and new media production. This writing intensive course develops fundamental skills for effective writing and storytelling. This is a required course for all students pursuing a major in Digital Journalism and New Media.

 

LAW, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY

LAPS-1003. Intro to Law, Politics, and Society

This course will introduce students to the relationships between law, politics, and Canadian society. Students will examine types of law, the judicial system, the legal profession, and the institutional, social, and cultural contexts in which laws are made and enforced. The course will engage students in debates about citizen rights, the policy-making role of courts, Aboriginal peoples and the law, public opinion and the legislative process, media and the law, and other topical issues.

 

MATHEMATICS

MATH-1013. Introduction to Calculus I

A review of analytic geometry and functions; derivatives of algebraic functions; mean value theorem; fundamental theorem of calculus; applications of differentiation, including extreme values and related rates; integration; differentials. Three hours of lecture and one tutorial per week. Prerequisite: grade 12 mathematics or equivalent.

 

MATH-1023. Introduction to Calculus II

Conic sections; transcendental functions and their derivatives; techniques of integration; areas and volumes; Taylor's theorem. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MATH 1013.

 

NATIVE 麻豆社区DIES

NATI-1006. Introduction to Native Studies

A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of Native Studies. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and sensitivity towards the past and present experience of Native peoples. The course will examine precontact history; the influences of colonialism and primitive accumulation/capitalism in the postcontact era; and contemporary issues - while emphasizing a historical and materialist perspective.

 

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-1013. What Is Philosophy? (Historical Introduction 1) 

To do philosophy is to reflect critically on our underlying beliefs (e.g., about reality, knowledge, freedom, responsibility) and to modify whatever doesn't stand up to scrutiny.  Whether we realize it or not, the very way we think is shaped by past thinkers -- which is why studying philosophy's history is a crucial part of doing philosophy.  In this course, we will focus on Ancient and Medieval thinkers as we strive to evaluate our views critically. This course has no prerequisite.

 

PHIL-1023. What Is Philosophy? (Historical Introduction 2) 

To do philosophy is to reflect critically on our underlying beliefs (e.g., about reality, knowledge, freedom, responsibility) and to modify whatever doesn't stand up to scrutiny. Whether we realize it or not, the very way we think is shaped by past thinkers -- which is why studying philosophy's history is a crucial part of doing philosophy.  In this course, we will focus on Modern and Contemporary thinkers as we strive to evaluate our views critically.  This course has no prerequisite.

 

PHIL-1043. Free Will: An Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the problem of free will. Students will be introduced to the current debate, but will also consider what the great minds of the past can tell us about the possibility or impossibility of acting freely. We will draw on both historical and contemporary sources, developing skills of philosophical analysis in connection with a single, hotly disputed topic. This course has no prerequisite.

 

PHIL-1053. Myth & Reason: An Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to philosophy focusing on the opposition between myth and reason. Students learn the skills of philosophical analysis by studying one topic in detail. Questions explored may include: How are myth and reason different? Are they opposed? What are the limits of reason? Can myth help reason? Can reason refute myth? What role does authority play in myth and reason? This course has no prerequisite.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS-1103. Canadian Government

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of the regime, authority, the rule of law, citizenship, and political obligation. It does so through a consideration of the institutions of Canadian government and covers the following topics: the framing of the constitution, federalism, parliamentary government, the Charter of Rights, the judiciary, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, and constitutional reform.

 

POLS-1603. Global Politics (HMRT 1203)

This course provides an introduction to the concepts of nation and state, sovereignty, forms of government, and political conflict. It does so through consideration of issues in world politics, such as human rights and social justice, ecological imbalance, economic inequalities, war, global governmental institutions and organizations.

 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC-1013. Introduction to Psychology I

This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, history of psychology, brain and behaviour, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and cognition.

 

PSYC-1023. Introduction to Psychology II

This course will introduce a variety of topics within psychology. Topics to be covered include research methods, developmental psychology, intelligence and creativity, personality, abnormal behaviour and therapy, social psychology, and applied topics.

 

RELIGIOUS 麻豆社区DIES

RELG-1006. Introduction to Religious Studies

A thematic, issues-oriented introduction to the study of religions. Some of the themes and issues explored may include social crisis and renewal, authority and power, sexual diversity, conflict and peace, evil and suffering, death and after death, food and music, among others. By means of these themes, students develop an active appreciation of diverse religious traditions and gain the tools to think critically about them.

 

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT

BUSI-1003. Introduction to Social Enterprise

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to social enterprise through historical and contemporary perspectives. It delves into the origins, principles, and practices of social enterprises. The course highlights the interconnectedness between social, economic, and environmental factors, and examines the impact of social enterprises on local communities and broader society. By critically examining case studies and engaging with relevant readings, students develop an understanding of the diverse strategies employed by social enterprises to address societal challenges and promote sustainable development.

 

BUSI-1013. Contemporary Case Studies in Social Enterprise

This course explores a range of social enterprises and their approaches to tackling various contemporary social issues, such as inequality, healthcare, equitable trade, and environmental sustainability. Students explore the underlying nature of these problems, the specific hurdles faced by affected communities, the strategies employed by social enterprises to tackle these challenges, and the degree of success they have achieved. Students develop an understanding of the diverse array of social enterprise initiatives and the social concerns they aim to address.

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOCI-1006. Introduction to Sociology

A survey course that introduces students to the discipline of sociology with particular reference to Canadian Society. This course examines theories and research concerning the nature of social order and conflict in industrial society; the relations between important structures or elements of society, including the economy, family, education, religion, complex organizations, racial and ethnic groups, and the dynamics of social change. Several major theoretical approaches in sociology are compared throughout the course.

 

SPANISH AND LATIN AMERICAN 麻豆社区DIES

SPAN-1006. Beginning Spanish

The beginner's course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It represents the basic level in the learning of Spanish. Teaching methods and texts will vary from year to year and from instructor to instructor. The aims of the course are the acquisition of (1) listening comprehension, (2) basic vocabulary suitable for everyday conversations, (3) simple grammatical structures, and (4) a knowledge of reading and writing techniques. The basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are emphasized. In addition, each instructor will introduce the students to selected elements of Hispanic Culture. In addition, students are required to attend a one-hour compulsory monitor session per week.